Where do cosmic rays originate? Cosmic rays are mostly high-energy protons from deep space that hit Earth’s upper atmosphere, creating showers of other particles that can be detected at the surface. Some of these protons are so incredibly high energy—meaning they’re moving just a whisker slower than the speed of light—that only exceptional astronomical events could accelerate them. The prime suspect: supernova explosions. Up until now, though, nobody had confirmed this suspicion. However, a new observation using gamma ray emissions from supernova remnants found the telltale signature of particle collisions, which could only be present if protons were getting that extra boost of energy.

On October 15, 1991, a high-energy proton from deep space struck Earth’s upper atmosphere. Known as the “Oh My God Particle”, this proton was by far the highest energy cosmic ray ever seen. This one proton’s energy was equivalent to a regulation soccer ball traveling at 15 meters per second (34 miles per hour). In the two decades following, observers spotted several similarly energetic cosmic rays, which left a big question: what was accelerating these protons to higher speeds than anything we can achieve in on Earth? [Read more….]

High-energy cosmic rays are sped on their way by exploding stars

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