OK, I might be feeling a little cranky about this, but my article for Ars Technica is a little more measured. I’ll have a longer analysis for Galileo’s Pendulum tomorrow, for those who want it. The short version: the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02) is a particle detector installed on the International Space Station. For several months, the lead investigator has been hinting that AMS-02 detected the signature of dark matter annihilation: collisions between dark matter particles producing an excess of positrons. However, the actual research paper was rather short on dark matter, however interesting the AMS-02 results really were.

The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02) is a particle detector based on the International Space Station, designed for looking at a variety of particles from many sources, among them dark matter collisions.¬†Recently, the AMS-02 research team announced the results of its first 18 months of data collection. These results are frustratingly ambiguous: while AMS-02 found an excess of certain type of particle expected from some models of dark matter annihilation, this excess didn’t bear the hallmarks predicted for a dark matter signature. So, something interesting is going on in the AMS-02 data, but the chances of dark matter being the cause seem a bit low. [Read more…]

Update: I published my rant over at Galileo’s Pendulum, explaining exactly why I’m grumpish about the way these results were announced and characterized in much of the media.

Much ado about nothing in today’s dark matter non-announcement

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