How standard are “standard candles”?

[ This blog is dedicated to tracking my most recent publications. Subscribe to the feed to keep up with all the science stories I write! ]

Not-so-standard candles

From Physics World:

The story is already legendary. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, two groups of rival researchers set out to measure the deceleration of the expanding universe. These groups often used the same observatory, sometimes even using the same telescope on consecutive nights. And they both found the same thing, publishing their results at roughly the same time in 1998–1999: the expansion of space–time isn’t slowing down at all. In fact, it’s getting faster. The leaders of those collaborations – Saul Perlmutter and Brian Schmidt – along with Adam Riess of the latter’s group, won the Nobel Prize for Physics in 2011 for this discovery. The implication of the result was that the universe consists not only of visible matter and dark matter, but also a gravitationally repulsive substance. Known as dark energy, the nature of this weird stuff remains as mysterious today as when it was first discovered.

Both groups used certain kinds of exploding stars called type Ia supernovae for their measurements. These supernovae brighten and fade in very similar ways and the current thinking is that this is because they have a common source: the explosion of either one or two white dwarfs, which are the stellar remnants of small-to-medium-mass stars such as the Sun. This consistent brightness allows astronomers to determine how far away the object was when the light left it and for that reason, type Ia supernovae are known as “standard candles” – reliable light- houses in the measurement of cosmic distances.

Or so we all thought.

The rest of this story is in the print edition of Physics World, which you can subscribe to through membership in the Institute of Physics, which costs £15, €20, or $25 per year. You can join by clicking here. You can also get a nice mobile- and tablet-formatted version of the story using the Physics World app, available in the Google Play and iTunes stores. However, if you just want to read the rest of this article, Physics World has kindly allowed me to offer it to you as a PDF download, which looks exactly like the printed version!

Advertisements