How loud is a rock in a Mars rover wheel?

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How does sound travel on Mars?

The Curiosity rover is scraping a rock along in its wheels, but what would that actually sound like to our ears?

For Astronomy Magazine:

A few weeks ago, a large rock got caught in one of the wheels of the Mars Curiosity rover. It’s an occupational hazard: unlike a car on Earth, the rover’s aluminum wheels are open on the sides with large cleats. That design allows Curiosity to go over rough terrain, including jagged rocks that would destroy other kinds of wheels.

Looking at pictures of the rock inside the wheel, Mars spacecraft engineer Kristin Block of University of Arizona’s Lunar and Planetary Laboratory idly asked: how loud would the rock sound? [Read the rest for the answer at Astronomy…]

Traces of salty water on Mars … and more mysteries!

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[Credit: Randall Munroe]

Water Found on Mars Could Be First Signs of Martian Life

NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter found traces of water that comes and goes on Mars—aka flowing water

For The Daily Beast:

We seem to discover water on Mars about once a year. Well, that’s not quite true: we’ve known Mars has water for quite a while. However, there are a lot of mysteries still to solve about how that water behaves and where it’s located. In particular, we’d like to know if water sometimes flows on the surface of the planet, which would tell us a lot about the cycles both above and below ground. And of course water is essential for life as we know it—finding flowing water, even transient flows, would make Mars seem a little more Earth-like.

The problem is that any liquid water evaporates quickly in the bone-dry Martian desert, and other processes can leave traces that mimic dried-up flows. When so little water is involved in the first place, it leaves us looking for the Martian equivalent of water spots on a long-dry drinking glass. And those spots are chemical traces—salt and other minerals once dissolved in the water—which must be identified by robotic spacecraft from orbit.

Today, scientists using NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) have identified some of those traces: a little bit of water comes and goes on Mars’ surface. [Read the rest at The Daily Beast…]

Methane on Mars: life or just gas?

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Methane on Mars: life or just gas?

From The Daily Beast:

Methane is a familiar chemical, whether you know it by that name or not. It’s the major component of natural gas, which heats my house and possibly yours too. Methane is also a large part of human gas, which means I could start this article with a fart joke if I really wanted to. (However, it’s not the smelly part, which is provided by sulfur compounds.) Lakes on Titan are full of methane, and the chemical is a major component of the giant planets Jupiter, Neptune, and so forth.

Mars is a different case, and an interesting one: it doesn’t have a lot of methane in its atmosphere at any given moment. However, several probes—most recently the Curiosity rover—have measured methane in the Martian atmosphere. Methane on Mars could possibly reveal that the planet is more active geologically than it seems, or even that it harbors microscopic life. [Read more at The Daily Beast….]