Yerkes Observatory: 1897-2018

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A few years ago, I visited Yerkes Observatory while driving across the country to gather material for a book that never came to fruition. It’s a marvelous relic of astronomy on the cusp of modernity, so when I heard it was closing its doors, I knew I had to write about it. Thankfully, Astronomy Magazine let me use some of my research from my book, including a few photographs. The following is a story of robber barons, huge telescopes, and an early unrecognized discovery of Pluto.

Yerkes Observatory is closing its doors

Once state of the art, this Gilded Age observatory has been left behind by progress. Now astronomers wonder what will happen to this piece of history.

Yerkes Observatory dome for the 40-inch refracting telescope. I rendered this photo in black and white for an old-timey feel, because why not? [Credit: moi]

For Astronomy Magazine:

A piece of astronomical history is closing its doors this year: Yerkes Observatory, which opened in 1897, will cease operations on October 1, 2018.

In many ways, this closure isn’t surprising. Yerkes is very much a relic of a past era, not the type of observatory that is used for major discoveries in the modern day. The University of Chicago, which owns and operates the facility, has decided the observatory is not worth the expense of maintaining it. However, we can hope someone will take over the operations and keep the building open to the public, because it’s truly one of the great pieces of scientific history and architecture. Yerkes Observatory is an impressive late-19th-century structure, housing what is still the largest refracting (lens-based) telescope in the world. The primary lens in the main Yerkes telescope is 40 inches (102 centimeters) in diameter. The observatory was named for the impressively mustached railroad tycoon Charles Yerkes, who bankrolled it in Gilded Age style. (The name is pronounced “YER-keys,” and the less said about how Yerkes ran his businesses, the better. “Yerkes was jerky” is a good mnemonic.)

The observatory stands on the shore of Geneva Lake in Williams Bay, Wisconsin, just across the border from Illinois. The land is sits on is parklike, and the building itself is a marvel of astronomical architecture and engineering from the dawn of the modern era of big science.

[Read the rest at Astronomy Magazine]

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Doing astronomy using gravity

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Astronomy without light

Gravitational waves let us see the invisible universe in new ways

For Astronomy Magazine:

Humans have always practiced some form of astronomy. For thousands of years, that meant observing only the light our eyes could see — either unaided or with a variety of instruments, such as astrolabes or telescopes. The 20th century brought new types of telescopes, which detect light we can’t see: infrared, X-ray, and so on.

Today, we’re witnessing the genesis of a whole new type of astronomy, and this one doesn’t use light at all. It uses gravitational waves.

Read the rest at Astronomy Magazine

How loud is a rock in a Mars rover wheel?

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How does sound travel on Mars?

The Curiosity rover is scraping a rock along in its wheels, but what would that actually sound like to our ears?

For Astronomy Magazine:

A few weeks ago, a large rock got caught in one of the wheels of the Mars Curiosity rover. It’s an occupational hazard: unlike a car on Earth, the rover’s aluminum wheels are open on the sides with large cleats. That design allows Curiosity to go over rough terrain, including jagged rocks that would destroy other kinds of wheels.

Looking at pictures of the rock inside the wheel, Mars spacecraft engineer Kristin Block of University of Arizona’s Lunar and Planetary Laboratory idly asked: how loud would the rock sound? [Read the rest for the answer at Astronomy…]