Finding the right math for medical problems

The linked article is for SIAM News, the magazine for members of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM). However, even though the main audience for this magazine is professional mathematicians, I wrote it to be understandable even if you gloss over the math. And it involves the word “tortuosity”, which is just fun to say.

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A Nonparametric Swiss Army Knife for Medicine

For SIAM News:

The complexity of living things is frequently humbling for mathematicians. Even a single cell contains a plethora of processes and complicated interactions that tractable mathematical models cannot easily describe. Researchers have applied nonlinear dynamics, mechanical analogs, and numerous other techniques to understand biological systems, but the tradeoffs of modeling often err on the side of reductionism.

For this reason, Heather Harrington of the University of Oxford and her collaborators are turning to global mathematical methods and drawing on experimental data to identify the best techniques. Harrington described several of these methods during her invited talk at the 2021 SIAM Conference on Applications of Dynamical Systems, which took place virtually earlier this year.

“The way that we look at dynamical systems is usually in a small region of the parameter space,” Harrington said. This approach is helpful if one knows a lot about the model and its parameters, but it can be hard to extract detailed predictions from the model if the parameters in question range over large values. “In biology, we often don’t know if the system is very close to a value in parameter space because the variables or parameters are difficult to measure or the data is too messy,” she added.

[read the rest at SIAM News]

The danger of climate change may be its rate

As with many of my other contributions to SIAM News, the article “It’s Not the Heat, It’s the Rate: Rate-Inducted Tipping’s Relation to Climate Change” includes some mathematical equations, but I’ve tried to write the piece so you can understand it even if you gloss over that part. And this article in particular has some important concepts relating to the biggest issue facing humanity today: climate change.

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It’s Not the Heat, It’s the Rate

Rate-Inducted Tipping’s Relation to Climate Change

For SIAM News:

For many years, scientists have warned that the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC)—the thermal cycle that drives currents in the Atlantic Ocean—is getting weaker [1]. Among other effects, the AMOC carries warm water to Ireland and the U.K. and returns cooler water from the north to southern regions. Instability in this circulation cycle could result in its complete collapse and cause widespread disruptions in temperature, changes in rain and snowfall patterns, and other natural disasters.

The potential loss of the AMOC represents a possible tipping point due to human-driven climate change. Global increases in temperature lead to warmer ocean water and melting polar ice, both of which decrease water density (see Figure 1). The subsequent lower-density water does not sink as much as it cools, thus disrupting the thermal cycle. When the AMOC collapsed in the prehistoric past, it jolted Earth’s climate and affected every ecosystem.

[Read the rest at SIAM News]

Bicycles, networks, and biological homeostasis

The linked article is for SIAM News, the magazine for members of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM). The audience for this magazine, in other words, is professional mathematicians and related researchers working in a wide variety of fields. While this article contains equations, I wrote it to be understandable even if you gloss over the math.

[ This blog is dedicated to tracking my most recent publications. Subscribe to the feed to keep up with all the science stories I write! ]

Balancing Homeostasis and Health

For SIAM News:

Human beings are not bicycles. However, mechanistic metaphors for the human body abound. For instance, we compare athletes to finely-tuned machines and look for equations that are derived from mechanics to describe biological processes — even when the relationship is no better than an analogy.

However, the concept of homeostasis clearly exemplifies the breakdown of mechanistic models when one applies them to the human body. Homeostasis is the process by which an organism maintains a stable output regardless of input (within reasonable limits). The most familiar example is human body temperature, which stays within a remarkably small range of values regardless of whether one is sitting in a cold room or walking outside on a hot day.

“In a bicycle, you know what each part is for,” Michael Reed, a mathematician at Duke University, said. “We are not machines with fixed parts; we are a large pile of cooperating cells. The question is, how does this pile of cooperating cells accomplish various tasks?”

[ Read the rest at SIAM News ]

Ecological stability far from equilibrium

toxic algae on Lake Erie, as seen by the Landsat 8 satellite

The linked article is for SIAM News, the magazine for members of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM). The audience for this magazine, in other words, is professional mathematicians and related researchers working in a wide variety of fields. While this article contains equations, I wrote it to be understandable even if you gloss over the math.

[ This blog is dedicated to tracking my most recent publications. Subscribe to the feed to keep up with all the science stories I write! ]

Ecological Transients and the Ghost of Equilibrium Past

For SIAM News:

The sight and smell of eutrophication—in the form of a layer of stinking green algae on a lake or pond—is likely familiar to many readers. The result is detrimental, even toxic, to other species that rely on the water, ranging from tiny animals to birds and even humans. For example, eutrophication on Lake Erie affects millions (see Figure 1). But the real culprit is actually the substance that feeds the algae: excess phosphorous that is produced by human activities like fertilizer runoff and leaky septic systems.

To manage eutrophication, one must know whether the affected body of water resides in a eutrophic stable state, or if its state is a long transient. The second case mimics stability because it can last a long time but is sustained by another source of phosphorous in the lakebed sediments. According to Tessa Francis, an ecologist at the University of Washington Puget Sound Institute, the wrong management choice has major consequences in terms of costs and trade-offs.

“You’re investing all of this social, political, and economic capital into management, but you’re getting no results from it,” Francis said. “If you gave the system a bigger smack by adding an alternative management strategy to tackle the phosphorus pool at the bottom of the lake, that would be more likely to get your lake back to the state you want. This is just one consequence of long transients in terms of how they affect management decisions.”

[Read the rest at SIAM NEWS]

The math behind leopard spots and chemical waves

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This article is a little different from the fare you’re used to getting from me: it’s for SIAM News, which is the glossy magazine for members of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM). The audience for this magazine, in other words, is professional mathematicians and related researchers working in a wide variety of fields. While the article contains equations, I wrote it to be understandable even if you skip over the math.

Leopard Spots, Frog Eggs, and the Spectrum of Nonlinear Diffusion Processes

For SIAM News:

Stripes, spots, or a mix of both appear on the skin of many animals — from tigers to beetles to whale sharks. These patterns are typically unique to individual creatures, and biologists often use them for identification. While distinct patterns may seem random, they obey certain rules that suggest a common underlying description. Striping and spotting occur in many unrelated species, implying that both evolutionary advantages and simple biochemical mechanisms drive such patterns.

As Björn Sandstede of Brown University noted during his invited address at the 2018 SIAM Annual Meeting, held in Portland, Ore., this July, similar patterns appear in certain chemical reactions and granular material under vibration. Nonlinear reactions and diffusion describe biological and non-biological patterns, producing stable concentrations in this space.

Alan Turing—best known for his work in computer science and cryptography—first made the mathematical connection between nonlinear diffusion processes and animal stripes in the 1950s. Many researchers have applied the resulting model to demonstrate how various species get their spots and describe nonlinear waves in chemical reactions.

[Read the rest at SIAM News]

Swarming in time, synchronizing in space

[ This blog is dedicated to tracking my most recent publications. Subscribe to the feed to keep up with all the science stories I write! ]

This article is a little different from the fare you’re used to getting from me: it’s for SIAM News, which is the glossy magazine for members of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. The audience for this magazine, in other words, is professional mathematicians and related researchers working in a wide variety of fields. In this case, I covered research by mathematicians looking at a type of system that occurs in biology and materials science. While the article contains equations, I wrote it to be understandable if you skim that part.

Self-organization in Space and Time

For SIAM News:

Self-organization is an important topic across scientific disciplines. Be it the spontaneous flocking of birds or dramatic phase transitions like superconductivity in materials, collective behavior without underlying intelligence occurs everywhere.

Many of these behaviors involve synchronization, or self-organization in time, such as activation in heart cells or the simultaneous blinking of certain firefly species. Others are aggregations, or self-organization in space, like swarming insects, flocking birds, or the alignment of electron spins in magnetic material.

Despite their conceptual similarity, self-organization in space and time have largely been treated separately. “I was curious about whether the two fields had been wedded, and it turns out they hadn’t, at least not fully,” Kevin O’Keeffe, a postdoctoral researcher at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, said. “I knew all these tricks and mathematical tools from synchronization, and I was looking to cross-fertilize them into the swarming world.”

[Read the rest at SIAM News]